Highlights


360° Science and Technology Film Festival

360° Science and Technology Film Festival is one of the key educational projects of Polytechnic Museum. Over the years, it established itself as a major event in the field of documentary films. The main objective of the Festival is to introduce the public to urgent and compelling documentary films about science, technology, and new ideas about the world and society. We aim to interest people in science and reach the broadest possible audience. We promote films and discussions, lectures, literature and art that inspire people to expand their knowledge and raise awareness.

Awards: the Great Award of the Jury, Jury Award, Audience Award and Media Jury Award.

The program of the Festival includes more than 20 documentaries.

Competition Program: films that will be premiered in Russia judged by the Jury that consists of experts in the field of cinema and science.

EUNIC — «Forgotten Future»: the program prepared in cooperation with the European Union National Institutes for Culture and dedicated to the future of our world.

People and technology: a few movies about how science and technology are changing our lives, thoughts concerning the nature of transformations our society is undergoing. Are we doing better, or are we losing something forever by going deeper in the digital world?

Children’s program: two films about the beauty and harmony of our world, which will leave unimpressed neither kids nor adults.

Special attention will be paid to the format of public talks.

Keynote speakers — public talks withs science and technology visionaries.

Discussion program covers socially relevant issues, specific aspects of science and technology, current problems discussed by Russian and international experts.

Q&A panels — short meetings with invited film directors to be held after the screenings.

By updating the concept we are hoping to reach a completely new level. We are invigorated by international festivals that unite different areas of knowledge. The Festival 360 ° has to become a territory of inspiration, where anyone can come into contact with new ideas about the world and the future, science and technologies. Not only through films but also through direct communication with people from the world of science and technology.

360° Science and Technology Film Festival is one of the key educational projects of Polytechnic Museum. Over the years, it established itself as a major event in the field of documentary films. The main objective of the Festival is to introduce the public to urgent and compelling documentary films about science, technology, and new ideas about the world and society. We aim to interest people in science and reach the broadest possible audience. We promote films and discussions, lectures, literature and art that inspire people to expand their knowledge and raise awareness.

Organizers: http://360.polymus.ru/en/about/organisers/

Film Screenings from the Program of  360° Science and Technology Film Festival:

October 26, 19:10 — Dishonesty

What if you installed a vending machine in a university that sold sweets but gave you the money back along with what you ordered? No one would call Customer Support to report the fault. But equally so, no one would take advantage and steal every last sweet from the vending machine: on average, people take three or four free chocolate bars and stop at that. Dan Ariely, a behavioural economics specialist has spent many years studying dishonesty in all its forms by setting up fun experiments like this and his conclusion is that everyone lies but usually just a little.
(Dis)Honesty — The Truth about Lies gives the full story about deception, with personal stories ranging from doping to adultery, from smear campaigns to insider trading, which help the viewer break down dishonesty into its component parts. Each subsequent lie comes a little easier. We find it easier to lie if we see others around us doing it too. We don’t consider white lies to be real lies. No one would move a golf ball to a better place by hand, but nudging it by foot — not a problem. When watching the participants in Ariely’s experiments and others in the movie, it’s tempting to say to yourself — I’d never act like that. But let’s not kid ourselves.

October 27, 18:10 — Lo and Behold

In his latest documentary film, Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World, first shown at the Sundance Film Festival, Werner Herzog dives into the past, present and future of the virtual world. With German exactitude and romanticism, he recounts the history of the Internet, from its pioneers at the University of California to modern visionaries like Elon Musk. However, Herzog is not only interested in scientific and technical achievements or the flip side: apocalyptic forecasts linked with the development of the world wide web, but primarily, how and why the Internet has radically changed and continues to change our lives to such an extent that when Herzog visited Buddhist monks, he observed that as soon as they had finished meditating, they immediately jumped onto twitter. Herzog explores the digital landscape with the same passion and dedication he had when crossing the wild landscapes of the Amazon, the Sahara and Antarctica, and talks about the mutual influence of two worlds: online and real life, which, now we have the Internet, will never be the same again.

October 28, 18:50 — Steve Jobs

It’s 2016 and people all around the world dutifully sit down and open their MacBooks to watch the presentation of Apple’s latest products — they praise, criticize, and discuss them in such detail, it’s as if the entire world population were hooked on an addictive tv show. And in a way they are: Apple has become part of the mythology of the modern world. Everyone has an opinion about it, and its history has become modern legend with its own canonical versions, apocrypha and prophets. Steve Jobs passed away five years ago but books and movies about him continue to be released. It’s natural — each new interpretation adds something to the portrait of one of the main modern-day prophets.
Alex Gibney’s Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine is another controversial chapter in this story. It is critical, which is, in fact, something that had been lacking. Gibney is a meticulous expounder of the myths of our century and doesn’t cut his subjects any slack. The Church of Scientology, big league sport, US foreign policy, WikiLeaks — he often grapples with topics that are impossible to neatly sum up and calls both the subjects themselves and the deeply-rooted, comfortable conventional attitudes towards them into question. The Man in the Machine centres around the stories of colleagues and associates about their personal relationship with Jobs, and attempts to paint a picture of the human side of the tech-icon with all his rough edges, shortcomings, debatable actions and decisions that the most famous man in a black turtleneck took throughout his career.

Also,

Lecture, October 28, 18:15-19:15, at the Amphitheatre
Can Search Engines Influence the Outcome of Elections?
Speaker: Robert Epstein

Recently, the media has widely discussed Robert Epstein’s study on the influence of search engines like Google on our decision-making process, actions, feelings, and in particular on the way we vote in elections — is it possible that this effect occurs without our knowledge? For the majority of computer and smart phone users, search engines are the main method of getting information. But how does a search engine decide which of the billions of web pages it will include in its “search results”, how does it rank them and what links make it onto the most-read top search results list? How are search algorithms written and can the top search results influence something more than consumer preference?

In his lecture, Robert Epstein will talk about the experiments conducted and two behavioural effects — preference shifting mechanisms that were identified as a result of research: The Search Engine Manipulation Effect (SEME) and the Search Suggestion Effect (SSE).

Does the Internet possess such subtle forms of influence? And if Google supports one of the candidates, will it decide the outcome of the election?

Robert Epstein, Senior Research Psychologist at the American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology (California), author of 15 books, former Editor-in-Chief of Psychology Today.